The Iceberg Effect Report

School Performance in Context: Indicators of School Inputs and Outputs in Nine Similar Nations is a joint project of the National Superintendents Roundtable and the Horace Mann League. Click below to download the full report and the summary report for free. Scroll down to purchase the full, four-color report and have it mailed to your door.

This report does what has been missing in international assessments like PISA and TIMSS…It provides a broader context to understand how education systems perform…simply an eye-opening reading experience!
— Palsi Sahlberg, Harvard University, author of Finnish Lessons

 

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The Summary Report
The Full Report (with data)

An Introduction to the Report:

 

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Fact Sheet on American Schools Today:

How does this report fit into the larger picture of the U.S. school system? Click to download the fact sheet here.

Reviews: What Educators are Saying About School Performance in Context (PDF):

 

It’s important that America understands what we’re facing as educators. We’re in a nation stricken with poverty and yet we’re not addressing it.
— Laurie Barron, superintendent, Kalispell, Montana

 

I come from a district with about 86 percent free and reduced lunch. I want to take these findings and educate my community. We need to make sure we’re attacking factors like poverty and social services.
— Leslie Boozer, superintendent, Fontana Unified School District, California

 

It’s amazing that we’re such a rich country and yet in my Iowa district, 63 percent of our children have financial needs. We’re not doing enough to help them and schools can’t do it all.
— Martha Bruckner, superintendent, Council Bluffs, Iowa

 

School Performance in Context underlines the irrationality of assigning undue importance to standardized tests. Defining American education by a score on a test disregards the many factors affecting that score, childhood poverty being one of the most significant.
— Dan Domenech, executive director, American Association of School Administrators (AASA)

 

Globalization means we have to be internationally engaged, economically and culturally. Future-focused leaders will benefit greatly from immersing themselves in the realistic international comparisons contained in this report.
— Joe A. Hairston, co-director, AASA-Howard University Urban Superintendents Academy

 

The most striking thing from the data—and something that all policymakers should be concerned about—is that here we sit as the wealthiest nation in the world and we have the highest percentage of children in our schools living in poverty.
— Charles Fowler, president, Lead Schools

 

It’s quite overwhelming to see the statistics on the broader context brought together in this way. It is impressive that American schools do as well as they do in this environment.
— Iris Rotberg, George Washington University; editor, Change and Tradition in Global Education Reform

 

The information in this report is far more informative than test scores alone. We can learn much from School Performance in Context about meaningful ways to help all children succeed in school.
— Diane Ravitch, New York University; author of Reign of Error

 

This report does what has been missing in international assessments like PISA and TIMSS…It provides a broader context to understand how education systems perform…simply an eye-opening reading experience!
— Palsi Sahlberg, Harvard University, author of Finnish Lessons

 

A fascinating report that highlights the importance of context and the…often deeply misleading nature of test scores taken in isolation.
— Alison Wolf, Kings College (London); education advisor, Government of Prime Minister David Cameron

 

This is a significant piece of work. I think it has real potential for furthering the conversation about where we really are in education in the United States.
— Karen Woodward, superintendent, Lexington Schools, South Carolina

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